Demographically associated variations in outcomes after bariatric surgery

Am J Surg. 2011 Apr;201(4):475-80. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2010.08.035.

Abstract

Background: The incidence of morbid obesity and the use of bariatric surgery as a weight loss tool have increased significantly over the past decade. Despite this increase, there has been limited large-scale database evaluation of the effects of demographics on postoperative occurrences.

Methods: An analysis of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database from 2005 to 2007 was performed. The bariatric procedures identified were open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding, vertical banded gastroplasty, restrictive procedures other than vertical banded gastroplasty, and biliopancreatic diversion/duodenal switch. Outcomes examined were 30-day mortality and American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-defined morbidities. Multivariate analysis was performed.

Results: A total of 18,682 bariatric procedures were identified. Increased body mass index, age, and undergoing open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass were associated with increased rates of postoperative complications. Hispanic and African American patients were noted to have increased rates of certain postoperative complications.

Conclusions: Demographic factors may influence the postoperative course of patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Prospective studies may further elucidate the associations between demographic factors and specific postoperative complications.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • African Americans / statistics & numerical data
  • Age Distribution
  • Bariatric Surgery / methods*
  • Bariatric Surgery / mortality*
  • Body Mass Index
  • Databases, Factual
  • Female
  • Gastric Bypass / methods
  • Hispanic Americans / statistics & numerical data
  • Humans
  • Laparoscopy / methods
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Obesity, Morbid / surgery*
  • Postoperative Complications / epidemiology*
  • Postoperative Complications / ethnology
  • Risk Factors
  • Treatment Outcome
  • United States / epidemiology