Community-based Participatory Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Cancer Screening Educational Intervention Among American Indians in the Northern Plains

J Cancer Educ. 2011 Sep;26(3):530-9. doi: 10.1007/s13187-011-0211-5.

Abstract

The study describes the creation and implementation of a culturally appropriate cancer education intervention, and assesses its efficacy among American Indians in a community with documented cancer-related disparities. Education workshops were developed and conducted on three western South Dakota reservations and in Rapid City by trained community representatives. Over 400 individuals participated in the 2-h workshops. Participants answered demographic questions, questions about previous cancer screening (to establish baseline screening rates), and completed a pre- and post-workshop quiz to assess learning. Participants demonstrated significant increases in cancer screening-related knowledge levels. Surveys reveal that participants found the information of high quality, great value and would recommend the program to friends. Pre-workshop data reveals cancer screening rates well below the national average. Workshop participants increased their knowledge about cancer etiology and screening. This intervention may represent an effective tool for increasing cancer screening utilization among American Indians.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Community-Based Participatory Research*
  • Delivery of Health Care
  • Early Detection of Cancer / psychology
  • Early Detection of Cancer / statistics & numerical data*
  • Female
  • Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice*
  • Healthcare Disparities
  • Humans
  • Indians, North American / psychology*
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Neoplasms / prevention & control*
  • Patient Education as Topic*
  • Young Adult