Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Review
, 90 (7), 830-40

Molecular Inflammation as an Underlying Mechanism of the Aging Process and Age-Related Diseases

Affiliations
Review

Molecular Inflammation as an Underlying Mechanism of the Aging Process and Age-Related Diseases

H Y Chung et al. J Dent Res.

Abstract

Aging is a biological process characterized by time-dependent functional declines that are influenced by changes in redox status and by oxidative stress-induced inflammatory reactions. An organism's pro-inflammatory status may underlie the aging process and age-related diseases. In this review, we explore the molecular basis of low-grade, unresolved, subclinical inflammation as a major risk factor for exacerbating the aging process and age-related diseases. We focus on the redox-sensitive transcription factors, NF-κB and FOXO, which play essential roles in the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and anti-oxidant enzymes, respectively. Major players in molecular inflammation are discussed with respect to the age-related up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules, cyclo-oxygenase-2, lipoxygenase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The molecular inflammation hypothesis proposed by our laboratory is briefly described to give further molecular insights into the intricate interplay among redox balance, pro-inflammatory gene activation, and chronic age-related inflammatory diseases. The final section discusses calorie restriction as an aging-retarding intervention that also exhibits extraordinarily effective anti-inflammatory activity by modulating GSH redox, NF-κB, SIRT1, PPARs, and FOXOs.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 60 PubMed Central articles

See all "Cited by" articles

Publication types

MeSH terms

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback