Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2011 Mar 28;6(3):e17913.
doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0017913.

Similarity in Recombination Rate Estimates Highly Correlates With Genetic Differentiation in Humans

Affiliations
Free PMC article

Similarity in Recombination Rate Estimates Highly Correlates With Genetic Differentiation in Humans

Hafid Laayouni et al. PLoS One. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Recombination varies greatly among species, as illustrated by the poor conservation of the recombination landscape between humans and chimpanzees. Thus, shorter evolutionary time frames are needed to understand the evolution of recombination. Here, we analyze its recent evolution in humans. We calculated the recombination rates between adjacent pairs of 636,933 common single-nucleotide polymorphism loci in 28 worldwide human populations and analyzed them in relation to genetic distances between populations. We found a strong and highly significant correlation between similarity in the recombination rates corrected for effective population size and genetic differentiation between populations. This correlation is observed at the genome-wide level, but also for each chromosome and when genetic distances and recombination similarities are calculated independently from different parts of the genome. Moreover, and more relevant, this relationship is robustly maintained when considering presence/absence of recombination hotspots. Simulations show that this correlation cannot be explained by biases in the inference of recombination rates caused by haplotype sharing among similar populations. This result indicates a rapid pace of evolution of recombination, within the time span of differentiation of modern humans.

Conflict of interest statement

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1. Recombination rate estimates (4Ner/Kb) corrected for effective population size for successive SNP-pairs for chromosome 22 for 6 populations.
Figure 2
Figure 2. Relationship between FST values and the recombination rate correlation based on 378 pairwise populations comparisons.
Figure 3
Figure 3. Relationship between FST values and the recombination rate correlation for SNPs with a) MAFs higher than 0.1 and b) MAFs higher than 0.2.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 8 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Kong A, Gudbjartsson DF, Sainz J, Jonsdottir GM, Gudjonsson SA, et al. A high-resolution recombination map of the human genome. Nat Genet. 2002;31:241–247. - PubMed
    1. Myers S, Bottolo L, Freeman C, McVean G, Donnelly P. A fine-scale map of recombination rates and hotspots across the human genome. Science. 2005;310:321–324. - PubMed
    1. Crawford DC, Bhangale T, Li N, Hellenthal G, Rieder MJ, et al. Evidence for substantial fine-scale variation in recombination rates across the human genome. Nat Genet. 2004;36:700–706. - PubMed
    1. McVean GA, Myers SR, Hunt S, Deloukas P, Bentley DR, et al. The fine-scale structure of recombination rate variation in the human genome. Science. 2004;304:581–584. - PubMed
    1. Ptak SE, Hinds DA, Koehler K, Nickel B, Patil N, et al. Fine-scale recombination patterns differ between chimpanzees and humans. Nat Genet. 2005;37:429–434. - PubMed

Publication types

Feedback