[Outcome and survival of pediatric Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS)]

Nutr Hosp. Jan-Feb 2011;26(1):239-42.
[Article in Spanish]

Abstract

Introduction: SBS is the main cause of intestinal failure (IF) in children and has a high morbility and mortality.

Objectives: to analyze factors associated with the outcome and survival of SBS children.

Methods: analytical, descriptive and retrospective study. We include patients with residual bowel length (RBL) ≤ 40 cm. OUTCOME is analyzed in groups: dead (D), adapted (A), parenteral nutrition dependant (NPD), and transplanted (Tx) according to: bowel anatomy, diagnosis, prematurely, year of beginning of IF, duration of IF, cholestasis (CB > 2 mg/dl) and thrombosis. Survival is analyzed with Kaplan Meier.

Results: 63 patients were included: RBL x 21 ± 11 cm, preserved colon 46%, prematures 41%, neonatal resection 78%, duration of IF x 0.66 years. 54% had cholestasis (CB x 5.29 ± 2.35 mg/dl) and 25% had thrombosis.

Outcome: D 33%, A 27%, PND 30% and Tx 10%. Adapted patients had longer RBL (p 0.001) and more preserved colon (p 0.017). 1 year survival was 86%, 2 years 70% and 3 years 66%. Age at death: x 2.3 years. Causes of death: hepatic failure 62%, lack of venous access 19%, sepsis 10%, others 10%. Factors related to death were shorter RBL (p 0.045), cholestasis (0.049, admittance to the center before 2000 (p 0.02).

Conclusions: SBS had a high mortality and 1/3 of patients could adapt requiring up to 5 years. Adaptation was in relation to anatomic factors. Mortality was related to.

Publication types

  • English Abstract

MeSH terms

  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Cholestasis / complications
  • Cholestasis / mortality
  • Colon / physiology
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Intestines / pathology
  • Kaplan-Meier Estimate
  • Organ Transplantation
  • Parenteral Nutrition
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Risk Factors
  • Short Bowel Syndrome / epidemiology
  • Short Bowel Syndrome / mortality
  • Short Bowel Syndrome / therapy*
  • Survival
  • Thrombosis / etiology
  • Thrombosis / mortality
  • Treatment Failure
  • Treatment Outcome