Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Applications of Angiogenesis

Nature. 2011 May 19;473(7347):298-307. doi: 10.1038/nature10144.

Abstract

Blood vessels deliver oxygen and nutrients to every part of the body, but also nourish diseases such as cancer. Over the past decade, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of angiogenesis (blood vessel growth) has increased at an explosive rate and has led to the approval of anti-angiogenic drugs for cancer and eye diseases. So far, hundreds of thousands of patients have benefited from blockers of the angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor, but limited efficacy and resistance remain outstanding problems. Recent preclinical and clinical studies have shown new molecular targets and principles, which may provide avenues for improving the therapeutic benefit from anti-angiogenic strategies.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Angiogenesis Inhibitors / pharmacology
  • Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use
  • Animals
  • Blood Vessels / growth & development
  • Blood Vessels / pathology
  • Blood Vessels / physiology*
  • Blood Vessels / physiopathology
  • Fibroblast Growth Factors / metabolism
  • Humans
  • Neovascularization, Physiologic / physiology*
  • Platelet-Derived Growth Factor / metabolism
  • Transforming Growth Factor beta / metabolism
  • Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / antagonists & inhibitors
  • Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / metabolism
  • Vesicular Transport Proteins / metabolism

Substances

  • Angiogenesis Inhibitors
  • Platelet-Derived Growth Factor
  • Transforming Growth Factor beta
  • Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
  • Vesicular Transport Proteins
  • Fibroblast Growth Factors