Arthroscopic treatment for acetabular labral tears of the hip without bony dysmorphism

Am J Sports Med. 2011 Jul;39 Suppl:79S-84S. doi: 10.1177/0363546511412915.

Abstract

Background: Surgical treatment for labral tears of the hip has shown good results in patients with bony impingement lesions; however, results are also affected by the correction of bony abnormalities. This study evaluates the outcome of arthroscopic treatment for acetabular labral tears without associated dysplasia or bony impingement lesions.

Hypothesis: Based on the structural importance of the acetabular labrum, labral tear debridement or repair can relieve pain and improve function.

Study design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods: The study included 81 patients who were categorized according to 4 morphologic labral tear types. The tear type, degree of synovitis, and chondral damage were analyzed with the use of multivariate regression analysis and correlated to the clinical outcome. The outcome was assessed utilizing the modified Harris hip score (MHHS) and the nonarthritic hip score (NAHS).

Results: There were 81 patients (81 hips), including 20 men and 61 women, with 41 right and 40 left hips. Their mean age was 44 years. Overall, at an average follow-up of 3 years the mean MHHS had improved by 18 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 13-23) and the mean NAHS by 17 points (95% CI, 12-22). An improvement after arthroscopic treatment was noticed in all types of labral tears of the hip. The level of synovitis and of chondral lesions was found to have a significant negative effect on the clinical outcome.

Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for acetabular labral tears of the hip without dysplasia or bony impingement lesions has good short- to midterm results. The best outcome is expected in the absence of synovitis and chondral lesions.

MeSH terms

  • Acetabulum / injuries*
  • Acetabulum / surgery*
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Arthroscopy / methods*
  • Bone and Bones / pathology*
  • Cartilage, Articular / injuries*
  • Female
  • Hip Joint / physiopathology
  • Hip Joint / surgery*
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Young Adult