Shaping plasticity to enhance recovery after injury

Prog Brain Res. 2011;192:273-95. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-53355-5.00015-4.

Abstract

The past decade of neuroscience research has provided considerable evidence that the adult brain can undergo substantial reorganization following injury. For example, following an ischemic lesion, such as occurs following a stroke, there is a cascade of molecular, genetic, physiological and anatomical events that allows the remaining structures in the brain to reorganize. Often, these events are associated with recovery, suggesting that they contribute to it. Indeed, the term plasticity in stroke research has had a positive connotation historically. But more recently, efforts have been made to differentiate beneficial from detrimental changes. These notions are timely now that neurorehabilitative research is developing novel treatments to modulate, increase, or inhibit plasticity in targeted brain regions. We will review basic principles of plasticity and some of the new and exciting approaches that are currently being investigated to shape plasticity following injury in the central nervous system.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Brain / anatomy & histology
  • Brain / pathology*
  • Brain / physiology
  • Brain Mapping / methods
  • Electric Stimulation Therapy
  • Humans
  • Neuronal Plasticity / physiology*
  • Recovery of Function / physiology*
  • Stroke / pathology*
  • Stroke / physiopathology
  • Stroke / therapy
  • Stroke Rehabilitation*