Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Review
, 57 (11), 1499-505

Carbamylation-derived Products: Bioactive Compounds and Potential Biomarkers in Chronic Renal Failure and Atherosclerosis

Affiliations
Review

Carbamylation-derived Products: Bioactive Compounds and Potential Biomarkers in Chronic Renal Failure and Atherosclerosis

Stéphane Jaisson et al. Clin Chem.

Abstract

Background: Carbamylation is a posttranslational modification of proteins resulting from the nonenzymatic reaction between isocyanic acid and specific free functional groups. This reaction alters protein structural and functional properties and thus contributes to molecular ageing. Many studies have shown the involvement of carbamylated proteins in diseases, especially in chronic renal failure and atherosclerosis.

Content: In this review we describe the biochemical basis of the carbamylation process and its role in protein molecular ageing. We summarize the current evidence of protein carbamylation involvement in disease, identify available biomarkers of the carbamylation process and their related analytical methods, and discuss the practical relevance of these biomarkers.

Summary: Carbamylation-induced protein alterations are involved in the progression of various diseases, because carbamylation-derived products (CDPs) are bioactive compounds that trigger specific and inappropriate cellular responses. For instance, carbamylation may promote hormone and enzyme inactivation, and carbamylated proteins, as diverse as collagen or LDLs, induce characteristic biochemical events of atherosclerosis progression. CDPs are potential biomarkers to monitor diseases characterized by an increased rate of carbamylation (e.g., chronic renal failure and atherosclerosis). Different methods (e.g., liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and immunoassays) to measure specific carbamylated proteins or general markers of carbamylation, such as protein-bound homocitrulline, have been described. Their use in clinical practice must still be validated by appropriate clinical studies.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 28 PubMed Central articles

See all "Cited by" articles

MeSH terms

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback