Motivating Voter Turnout by Invoking the Self

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Aug 2;108(31):12653-6. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1103343108. Epub 2011 Jul 18.

Abstract

Three randomized experiments found that subtle linguistic cues have the power to increase voting and related behavior. The phrasing of survey items was varied to frame voting either as the enactment of a personal identity (e.g., "being a voter") or as simply a behavior (e.g., "voting"). As predicted, the personal-identity phrasing significantly increased interest in registering to vote (experiment 1) and, in two statewide elections in the United States, voter turnout as assessed by official state records (experiments 2 and 3). These results provide evidence that people are continually managing their self-concepts, seeking to assume or affirm valued personal identities. The results further demonstrate how this process can be channeled to motivate important socially relevant behavior.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Humans
  • Meta-Analysis as Topic
  • Motivation*
  • Politics*
  • Self Concept*
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Surveys and Questionnaires