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, 2011, 146865

Coffee Consumption and cystatin-C-based Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rates in Healthy Young Adults: Results of a Clinical Trial

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Coffee Consumption and cystatin-C-based Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rates in Healthy Young Adults: Results of a Clinical Trial

Masafumi Saito et al. J Nutr Metab.

Abstract

Recently it has been reported that the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is higher in habitual coffee consumers than in noncoffee consumers. However, the causality remains unclear. Therefore, we conducted a clinical trial to investigate the effects of coffee consumption on kidney function. Nineteen asymptomatic nonsmokers aged 21-27 years old participated in this study. They consumed coffee (18 g coffee beans/450 mL per day) or green tea as a comparator for 2 weeks in a crossover design. Although creatinine-based eGFR was not affected after consuming either beverage, all cystatin-C-based eGFRs determined using five different equations were significantly increased after coffee consumption (means: 5.0-7.7%), but not after green tea consumption (means: 0.1-1.6%). Serum adiponectin and magnesium levels increased significantly after coffee consumption (means: 13.6% and 4.3%, resp.), but not after green tea consumption. These findings suggest that even a short period of coffee consumption may increase cystatin-C-based eGFR, along with favorable changes in serum adiponectin, in healthy young adults.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Summary of changes in variables according to coffee consumption and green tea consumption.

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