Smoking and cervical cancer

ISRN Obstet Gynecol. 2011;2011:847684. doi: 10.5402/2011/847684. Epub 2011 Jul 14.

Abstract

Cervical cancer (CC) is the third most common cancer in women worldwide; however, CC is a preventable disease, and much effort should be done to prevent it. Persistence of high-risk HPV infection is the strongest epidemiologic risk factor for CC, however it is not sufficient for development of the disease it cofactors should be present. In 2004; IARC listed cervical cancer among those causally related to smoking. Smoking interferes with incidence and prevalence of HPV infection and is associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive CC. Multiple factors seem to intervene on cervical carcinogenesis related with tobacco, especially by direct local carcinogenic effect and local immunosuppression. Smoking addition is also closely related with other confounding factors, like unfavorable psychosocial events, systemic immunity, contraception, and nutrition, which got difficult epidemiologic evaluation of smoking role on cervical carcinogenesis. Smoking habits should be taken in account in clinical practice and in research concerning CC.