Morris water maze test for learning and memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease model mice

J Vis Exp. 2011 Jul 20;(53):2920. doi: 10.3791/2920.

Abstract

The Morris Water Maze (MWM) was first established by neuroscientist Richard G. Morris in 1981 in order to test hippocampal-dependent learning, including acquisition of spatial memory and long-term spatial memory. The MWM is a relatively simple procedure typically consisting of six day trials, the main advantage being the differentiation between the spatial (hidden-platform) and non-spatial (visible platform) conditions. In addition, the MWM testing environment reduces odor trail interference. This has led the task to be used extensively in the study of the neurobiology and neuropharmacology of spatial learning and memory. The MWM plays an important role in the validation of rodent models for neurocognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease. In this protocol we discussed the typical procedure of MWM for testing learning and memory and data analysis commonly used in Alzheimer's disease transgenic model mice.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Video-Audio Media

MeSH terms

  • Alzheimer Disease / diagnosis*
  • Alzheimer Disease / physiopathology*
  • Animals
  • Disease Models, Animal*
  • Maze Learning*
  • Memory Disorders / diagnosis*
  • Memory Disorders / etiology
  • Memory Disorders / physiopathology*
  • Mice
  • Swimming*