The Hippo pathway in organ size control, tissue regeneration and stem cell self-renewal

Nat Cell Biol. 2011 Aug 1;13(8):877-83. doi: 10.1038/ncb2303.

Abstract

Precise control of organ size is crucial during animal development and regeneration. In Drosophila and mammals, studies over the past decade have uncovered a critical role for the Hippo tumour-suppressor pathway in the regulation of organ size. Dysregulation of this pathway leads to massive overgrowth of tissue. The Hippo signalling pathway is highly conserved and limits organ size by phosphorylating and inhibiting the transcription co-activators YAP and TAZ in mammals and Yki in Drosophila, key regulators of proliferation and apoptosis. The Hippo pathway also has a critical role in the self-renewal and expansion of stem cells and tissue-specific progenitor cells, and has important functions in tissue regeneration. Emerging evidence shows that the Hippo pathway is regulated by cell polarity, cell adhesion and cell junction proteins. In this review we summarize current understanding of the composition and regulation of the Hippo pathway, and discuss how cell polarity and cell adhesion proteins inform the role of this pathway in organ size control and regeneration.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Cell Adhesion / physiology
  • Cell Polarity / physiology
  • Drosophila / cytology
  • Drosophila / physiology
  • Drosophila Proteins / physiology*
  • Humans
  • Intercellular Junctions / physiology
  • Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins / physiology*
  • Mice
  • Models, Biological
  • Organ Size / physiology*
  • Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / physiology*
  • Regeneration / physiology*
  • Signal Transduction
  • Stem Cells / cytology*
  • Stem Cells / physiology*

Substances

  • Drosophila Proteins
  • Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
  • Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
  • hpo protein, Drosophila