Prevalence of medication administration errors in two medical units with automated prescription and dispensing

J Am Med Inform Assoc. Jan-Feb 2012;19(1):72-8. doi: 10.1136/amiajnl-2011-000332. Epub 2011 Sep 2.

Abstract

Objective: To identify the frequency of medication administration errors and their potential risk factors in units using a computerized prescription order entry program and profiled automated dispensing cabinets.

Design: Prospective observational study conducted within two clinical units of the Gastroenterology Department in a 1537-bed tertiary teaching hospital in Madrid (Spain).

Measurements: Medication errors were measured using the disguised observation technique. Types of medication errors and their potential severity were described. The correlation between potential risk factors and medication errors was studied to identify potential causes.

Results: In total, 2314 medication administrations to 73 patients were observed: 509 errors were recorded (22.0%)-68 (13.4%) in preparation and 441 (86.6%) in administration. The most frequent errors were use of wrong administration techniques (especially concerning food intake (13.9%)), wrong reconstitution/dilution (1.7%), omission (1.4%), and wrong infusion speed (1.2%). Errors were classified as no damage (95.7%), no damage but monitoring required (2.3%), and temporary damage (0.4%). Potential clinical severity could not be assessed in 1.6% of cases. The potential risk factors morning shift, evening shift, Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical medication class antacids, prokinetics, antibiotics and immunosuppressants, oral administration, and intravenous administration were associated with a higher risk of administration errors. No association was found with variables related to understaffing or nurse's experience.

Conclusions: Medication administration errors persist in units with automated prescription and dispensing. We identified a need to improve nurses' working procedures and to implement a Clinical Decision Support tool that generates recommendations about scheduling according to dietary restrictions, preparation of medication before parenteral administration, and adequate infusion rates.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Gastroenterology
  • Health Services Research
  • Hospital Departments
  • Hospital Units
  • Hospitals, Teaching
  • Humans
  • Medical Order Entry Systems*
  • Medication Errors / statistics & numerical data*
  • Medication Systems, Hospital / statistics & numerical data*
  • Spain