Self-efficacy mediates the relationship between behavioral processes of change and physical activity in older breast cancer survivors

Breast Cancer. 2013 Jan;20(1):47-52. doi: 10.1007/s12282-011-0298-x. Epub 2011 Sep 10.

Abstract

Background: The degree to which breast cancer survivors use behavioral processes of change has not been investigated. Additionally, the relationship between behavioral processes and other theory-based mediators of adult physical activity behavior has not been extensively studied among breast cancer survivors. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine the extent to which breast cancer survivors use behavioral processes associated with physical activity behavior change, and (2) examine the inter-relationships between behavioral processes, self-efficacy, and physical activity behavior among breast cancer survivors.

Methods: Sixty-nine breast cancer survivors completed surveys examining behavioral processes and exercise-specific self-efficacy. Six months later they completed a self-report physical activity questionnaire.

Results: Findings showed the majority of breast cancer survivors did not use approximately half of the behavioral processes on a regular basis, and self-efficacy completely mediated the relationship between behavioral processes and physical activity.

Conclusion: Health care professionals may help enhance self-efficacy and ultimately increase physical activity behavior in breast cancer survivors by teaching behavior skills such as enlisting social support.

MeSH terms

  • Aged
  • Breast Neoplasms / psychology*
  • Breast Neoplasms / therapy
  • Exercise
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Motor Activity*
  • Self Efficacy
  • Social Support
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Survivors / psychology*