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, 18 (1), 16-8

Comparison of Estimated Energy Requirements in Severely Burned Patients With Measurements by Using Indirect Calorimetry

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Comparison of Estimated Energy Requirements in Severely Burned Patients With Measurements by Using Indirect Calorimetry

D Tancheva et al. Ann Burns Fire Disasters.

Abstract

Severe burn injuries give rise to an extreme state of physiological stress. No other trauma results in such an accelerated rate of tissue catabolism, loss of lean body mass, and depletion of energy and protein reserves. A heightened attention to energy needs is essential, and the significance of adequate nutritional support in the complex management of patients with major burns is very important. The purpose of this study is to compare the results obtained by three of the most popular methods of estimating energy requirements in severely burned adult patients with the measurements of resting energy (REE) expenditure by indirect calorimetry (IC). A prospective study was carried out of 20 patients (male/female ratio, 17/3; mean age, 37.83 ± 10.86 yr), without accompanying morbidities, with burn injuries covering a mean body surface area of 34.27 ± 11.55% and a mean abbreviated burn severity index of 7.44 ± 1.58. During the first 30 days after trauma, the energy requirements were estimated using the Curreri, Long, and Toronto formulas. Twice weekly measurements of REE by IC were obtained. It was found that the Curreri and Long formulas overestimated the energy requirements in severely burned patients, as found by other investigators. However, no significant difference was found between the daily energy requirements calculated by the Toronto formula and the measured REE values by IC. It is concluded that the Toronto formula can be used as an alternative method for estimating the energy requirements of patients with major burns in cases where IC is not available or not applicable.

Keywords: burned; calorimetry; energy; indirect; measurements; patients; requirements; severely.

Figures

Table I
Table I. Demographic analysis
Table II
Table II. Protocol for applying IC
Table III
Table III. Formulas used for estimation of daily energy requirements
Table IV
Table IV. Comparative assessment of values obtained by Toronto, Long, and Curreri formulas and IC
Fig. 1
Fig. 1. Comparative assessment.

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