Low Water Intake and Risk for New-Onset Hyperglycemia

Diabetes Care. 2011 Dec;34(12):2551-4. doi: 10.2337/dc11-0652. Epub 2011 Oct 12.

Abstract

Objective: Water intake alters vasopressin secretion. Recent findings reveal an independent association between plasma copeptin, a surrogate for vasopressin, and risk of diabetes.

Research design and methods: Participants were 3,615 middle-aged men and women, with normal baseline fasting glycemia (FG), who were recruited in a 9-year follow-up study. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for the incidence of hyperglycemia (FG ≥6.1 mmol/L or treatment for diabetes) were calculated according to daily water intake classes based on a self-administered questionnaire.

Results: During follow-up, there were 565 incident cases of hyperglycemia. After adjustment for confounding factors, ORs (95% CIs) for hyperglycemia associated with classes of water intake (<0.5 L, n = 677; 0.5 to <1.0 L, n = 1,754; and >1.0 L, n = 1,184) were 1.00, 0.68 (0.52-0.89), and 0.79 (0.59-1.05), respectively (P = 0.016).

Conclusions: Self-reported water intake was inversely and independently associated with the risk of developing hyperglycemia.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Cohort Studies
  • Diabetes Mellitus / epidemiology
  • Diabetes Mellitus / etiology*
  • Drinking*
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • France / epidemiology
  • Glycopeptides / blood
  • Humans
  • Hyperglycemia / epidemiology
  • Hyperglycemia / etiology*
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Risk

Substances

  • Glycopeptides
  • copeptins