Exercise improves global well-being in adults with fibromyalgia: confirmation of previous meta-analytic results using a recently developed and novel varying coefficient model

Clin Exp Rheumatol. Nov-Dec 2011;29(6 Suppl 69):S60-2. Epub 2012 Jan 3.

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the effects of exercise (aerobic, strength training or both) on global well-being in adults with fibromyalgia (FM).

Methods: The meta-analytic approach and recently developed varying coefficient model were used to pool the results of previous randomised controlled trials of exercise (aerobic, strength training or both) on global well-being in adults with FM. The standardised effect size (ES) for global well-being from each study was pooled using a recently developed and novel varying coefficient (VC) model and partitioned according to per-protocol and intention-to-treat analyses. Results were also compared to the traditionally used random effects (RE) model. Non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals were considered statistically significant with negative ESs indicative of improvements in global well-being.

Results: Five ESs representing 377 participants were included in the per-protocol analysis and 5 ESs representing 252 participants were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Using the VC model, statistically significant improvements in global-well being were found for both per-protocol (-X, -0.39, 95% CI, -0.62, -0.15) and intention-to-treat analysis (-X, -0.40, 95% CI, -0.68, -0.13). Results were similar to those from the RE model.

Conclusions: Using the recently developed and more valid varying coefficient model, these findings confirm that exercise improves global-well being in adults with FM.

Publication types

  • Meta-Analysis
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Chronic Pain / physiopathology
  • Chronic Pain / therapy*
  • Exercise / physiology*
  • Exercise Therapy / methods
  • Fibromyalgia / physiopathology
  • Fibromyalgia / therapy*
  • Health Status*
  • Humans
  • Models, Statistical
  • Pain Management
  • Quality of Life*
  • Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
  • Syndrome
  • Young Adult