Using a modified technology acceptance model to evaluate healthcare professionals' adoption of a new telemonitoring system

Telemed J E Health. Jan-Feb 2012;18(1):54-9. doi: 10.1089/tmj.2011.0066. Epub 2011 Nov 14.

Abstract

Objective: To examine the factors that could influence the decision of healthcare professionals to use a telemonitoring system.

Materials and methods: A questionnaire, based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), was developed. A panel of experts in technology assessment evaluated the face and content validity of the instrument. Two hundred and thirty-four questionnaires were distributed among nurses and doctors of the cardiology, pulmonology, and internal medicine departments of a tertiary hospital. Cronbach alpha was calculated to measure the internal consistency of the questionnaire items. Construct validity was evaluated using interitem correlation analysis. Logistic regression analysis was performed to test the theoretical model. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed.

Results: A response rate of 39.7% was achieved. With the exception of one theoretical construct (Habit) that corresponds to behaviors that become automatized, Cronbach alpha values were acceptably high for the remaining constructs. Theoretical variables were well correlated with each other and with the dependent variable. The original TAM was good at predicting telemonitoring usage intention, Perceived Usefulness being the only significant predictor (OR: 5.28, 95% CI: 2.12-13.11). The model was still significant and more powerful when the other theoretical variables were added. However, the only significant predictor in the modified model was Facilitators (OR: 4.96, 95% CI: 1.59-15.55).

Conclusion: The TAM is a good predictive model of healthcare professionals' intention to use telemonitoring. However, the perception of facilitators is the most important variable to consider for increasing doctors' and nurses' intention to use the new technology.

Publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Attitude to Computers*
  • Confidence Intervals
  • Female
  • Health Care Surveys
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Male
  • Medical Informatics / organization & administration*
  • Middle Aged
  • Monitoring, Physiologic / instrumentation*
  • Monitoring, Physiologic / methods
  • Monitoring, Physiologic / statistics & numerical data
  • Odds Ratio
  • Spain
  • Telemedicine / organization & administration*