Secular trends in Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence in adults in the United States: evidence for sustained race/ethnic disparities

Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Jan 1;175(1):54-9. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwr288. Epub 2011 Nov 15.

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence levels in US adults participating in the continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2000) increased with age in all racial/ethnic groups, with significantly higher age-standardized levels in Mexican Americans (64.0%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 58.8, 69.2) and non-Hispanic blacks (52.0%, 95% CI: 48.3, 55.7) compared with non-Hispanic whites (21.2%, 95% CI: 19.1, 23.2). Although seroprevalence levels remained similar to those found in National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 1988 to 1991 among non-Hispanic blacks and Mexican Americans, they were significantly lower in non-Hispanic whites, especially at older ages. The factors driving the decline in H. pylori seroprevalence appear to be acting preferentially on the non-Hispanic white population.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • African Americans
  • Age Distribution
  • Aged
  • Antibodies, Bacterial / blood*
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • European Continental Ancestry Group
  • Health Status Disparities*
  • Helicobacter Infections / blood
  • Helicobacter Infections / ethnology*
  • Helicobacter pylori / immunology
  • Helicobacter pylori / isolation & purification*
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Middle Aged
  • Nutrition Surveys
  • Seroepidemiologic Studies
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • United States / epidemiology

Substances

  • Antibodies, Bacterial