The changing and dynamic epidemiology of meningococcal disease

Vaccine. 2012 May 30;30 Suppl 2:B26-36. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.12.032. Epub 2011 Dec 15.

Abstract

The epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease continues to change rapidly, even in the three years since the first Meningococcal Exchange Meeting in 2008. Control of disease caused by serogroup C has been achieved in countries that have implemented meningococcal C or quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY conjugate vaccines. Initiation of mass immunization programs with meningococcal A conjugate vaccines across the meningitis belt of Africa may lead to the interruption of cyclical meningococcal epidemics. A meningococcal B vaccination program in New Zealand has led to a decreased incidence of high rates of endemic serogroup B disease. Increases in serogroup Y disease have been observed in certain Nordic countries which, if they persist, may require consideration of use of a multiple serogroup vaccine. The imminent availability of recombinant broadly protective serogroup B vaccines may provide the tools for further control of invasive meningococcal disease in areas where serogroup B disease predominates. Continued surveillance of meningococcal disease is essential; ongoing global efforts to improve the completeness of reporting are required.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Global Health
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Meningitis, Bacterial / epidemiology
  • Meningitis, Bacterial / microbiology
  • Meningitis, Bacterial / prevention & control
  • Meningococcal Infections / epidemiology*
  • Meningococcal Infections / microbiology*
  • Meningococcal Infections / prevention & control
  • Meningococcal Vaccines / administration & dosage
  • Meningococcal Vaccines / immunology
  • Neisseria meningitidis / classification*
  • Neisseria meningitidis / isolation & purification*
  • Neisseria meningitidis / pathogenicity
  • Sepsis / epidemiology
  • Sepsis / microbiology
  • Sepsis / prevention & control

Substances

  • Meningococcal Vaccines