The roles of tumor-derived exosomes in cancer pathogenesis

Clin Dev Immunol. 2011;2011:842849. doi: 10.1155/2011/842849. Epub 2011 Nov 30.

Abstract

Exosomes are endosome-derived, 30-100 nm small membrane vesicles released by most cell types including tumor cells. They are enriched in a selective repertoire of proteins and nucleic acids from parental cells and are thought to be actively involved in conferring intercellular signals. Tumor-derived exosomes have been viewed as a source of tumor antigens that can be used to induce antitumor immune responses. However, tumor-derived exosomes also have been found to possess immunosuppressive properties and are able to facilitate tumor growth, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance. These different effects of tumor-derived exosomes contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer. This review will discuss the roles of tumor-derived exosomes in cancer pathogenesis, therapy, and diagnostics.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Antigens, Neoplasm / immunology
  • Antigens, Neoplasm / metabolism
  • Exosomes / immunology*
  • Exosomes / metabolism*
  • Humans
  • Neoplasms / immunology*
  • Neoplasms / metabolism*

Substances

  • Antigens, Neoplasm