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, 5 (4), 506-12

Serum IP-10 Levels Correlate With the Severity of Liver Histopathology in Patients Infected With Genotype-1 HCV

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Serum IP-10 Levels Correlate With the Severity of Liver Histopathology in Patients Infected With Genotype-1 HCV

Chan Ran You et al. Gut Liver.

Abstract

Background/aims: Interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) plays important roles in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We investigated the association between serum IP-10 levels and liver pathology in patients with chronic HCV infection.

Methods: The serum IP-10 concentration was assessed in 85 patients with chronic HCV infection using a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and a liver biopsy specimen was obtained. The pathology was scored using the Knodell histologic activity index (HAI).

Results: Of the 85 patients, 58 had genotype 1 HCV infection, 21 had genotype non-1, and 6 were undetermined. The serum IP-10 levels did not differ between patients infected with genotype 1 and genotype non-1 (p=0.472). In patients with genotype 1 infection, the total HAI score and the stage of fibrosis were highly correlated with the serum IP-10 level (r=0.555, r=0.578, p<0.001). Furthermore, the serum IP-10 concentrations of patients with severe fibrosis (stages 3, 4) were higher than those of patients with mild fibrosis (stages 0 to 2; 214.4 vs. 72.3 pg/mL, p=0.002) among patients with genotype 1 infection. However, in patients without genotype 1 infection, the histopathology was not associated with the serum IP-10 level. A multivariate analysis showed that serum IP-10 was an independent predictor of fibrosis (stages 3, 4) in patients with genotype 1 infection (odds ratio, 1.034; 95% confidence interval, 1.006 to 1.064; p=0.018).

Conclusions: Serum IP-10 concentration was significantly correlated with the severity of liver histology in genotype 1 HCV infection.

Keywords: Chronic hepatitis C; Fibrosis; Interferon-γ-inducible protein 10.

Conflict of interest statement

No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Serum interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) concentrations did not differ significantly between patients with genotype 1 (n=58) and those without genotype 1 (n=21).
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
The serum interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) concentration positively correlated with histopathological severity in patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection. HAI, histologic activity index.
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
The correlations between serum interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) concentration and histopathological findings in patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection: piecemeal necrosis (A), intralobular degeneration (B), portal inflammation (C), and fibrosis (D). In patients with genotype 1 HCV infection, the serum IP-10 concentration was significantly correlated with the scores for piecemeal necrosis, portal inflammation, and fibrosis (A, C, and D).
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
The serum interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) concentrations were higher in patients with severe fibrosis (stages 3, 4) than in patients with mild fibrosis (stages 0 to 2, 214.4 vs 72.3 pg/mL, p=0.002).
Fig. 5
Fig. 5
The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the serum interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) concentrations in patients with genotype 1 infection and severe fibrosis (stages 3, 4). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.846 (95% confidence interval, 0.740 to 0.952), and the cutoff value of the serum IP-10 concentration was 100.3 pg/mL (sensitivity, 82.6%; specificity, 72.7%).
Fig. 6
Fig. 6
The serum interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) concentration did not correlate with the severity of pathology in patients with genotype non-1 hepatitis C virus infection. HAI, histologic activity index.
Fig. 7
Fig. 7
The correlations between the serum interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) concentration and pathology findings in patients with genotype non-1 hepatitis C virus infection: piecemeal necrosis (A), intralobular degeneration (B), portal inflammation (C), and fibrosis (D). In these patients, the serum IP-10 concentration did not correlate with the scores for piecemeal necrosis, intralobular degeneration, portal inflammation, or fibrosis.

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