Proprioceptive recalibration in the right and left hands following abrupt visuomotor adaptation

Exp Brain Res. 2012 Mar;217(2):187-96. doi: 10.1007/s00221-011-2985-4. Epub 2011 Dec 24.

Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated that after reaching with misaligned visual feedback of the hand, one adapts his or her reaches and partially recalibrates proprioception, such that sense of felt hand position is shifted to match the seen hand position. However, to date, this has only been demonstrated in the right (dominant) hand following reach training with a visuomotor distortion in which the rotated cursor distortion was introduced gradually. As reach adaptation has been shown to differ depending on how the distortion is introduced (gradual vs. abrupt), we sought to examine proprioceptive recalibration following reach training with a cursor that was abruptly rotated 30° clockwise relative to hand motion. Furthermore, because the left and right arms have demonstrated selective advantages when matching visual and proprioceptive targets, respectively, we assessed proprioceptive recalibration in right-handed subjects following training with either the right or the left hand. On average, we observed shifts in felt hand position of approximately 7.6° following training with misaligned visual feedback of the hand, which is consistent with our previous findings in which the distortion was introduced gradually. Moreover, no difference was observed in proprioceptive recalibration across the left and right hands. These findings suggest that proprioceptive recalibration is a robust process that arises symmetrically in the two hands following visuomotor adaptation regardless of the initial magnitude of the error signal.

Publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adaptation, Physiological / physiology*
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Movement / physiology
  • Proprioception / physiology*
  • Psychomotor Performance / physiology*
  • Visual Perception / physiology*