Associations between phthalate metabolite urinary concentrations and body size measures in New York City children

Environ Res. 2012 Jan;112:186-93. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2011.12.006. Epub 2012 Jan 4.

Abstract

Objective: To examine prospectively associations between urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and body size measures in children.

Methods: Urinary concentrations of nine phthalate metabolites: monoethyl (MEP); mono-n-butyl (MBP); mono-(3-carboxypropyl) (MCPP); monobenzyl (MBzP); mono-isobutyl (MiBP); mono-(2-ethylhexyl) (MEHP); mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) (MEOHP); mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) (MECPP); and mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP) and the molar sum of the low molecular-weight phthalate metabolites (low MWP: MEP, MBP and MiBP) and high molecular-weight phthalate metabolites (high MWP: MECPP, MEHHP, MEOHP, MEHP and MBzP) and of four di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites (ΣDEHP: MEHP, MEHHP, MEOHP, MECPP) and anthropometry, including body mass index and waist circumference were measured among 387 Hispanic and Black, New York City children who were between six and eight years at cohort enrollment (2004-2007). Relationships between baseline metabolite concentrations and body size characteristics obtained one year later were examined using multivariate-adjusted geometric means for each body size characteristic by continuous and categories of phthalate metabolite concentrations. Stratified analyses by body size (age/sex specific) were conducted.

Results: No significant associations are reported among all girls or boys. Dose response relationships were seen with monoethyl phthalate and the sum of low molecular-weight phthalates and body mass index and waist circumference among overweight children; for increasing monoethyl phthalate concentration quartiles among girls, adjusted mean body mass indexes were as follows: 21.3, 21.7, 23.8, 23.5 and adjusted mean waist circumference (cm) were as follows: 73.4, 73.5, 79.2, 78.8 (p-trend<0.001 for both).

Conclusion: In this prospective analysis we identified positive relationships between urinary concentrations of monoethyl phthalate and the sum of low molecular-weight phthalates and body size measures in overweight children. These are metabolites with concentrations above 1 μM.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • African Americans
  • Body Size / drug effects*
  • Child
  • Cohort Studies
  • Data Interpretation, Statistical
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Environmental Pollutants / toxicity
  • Environmental Pollutants / urine*
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Humans
  • Male
  • New York City
  • Phthalic Acids / metabolism
  • Phthalic Acids / toxicity
  • Phthalic Acids / urine*
  • Prospective Studies

Substances

  • Environmental Pollutants
  • Phthalic Acids
  • phthalic acid