Effect of KRAS oncogene substitutions on protein behavior: implications for signaling and clinical outcome

J Natl Cancer Inst. 2012 Feb 8;104(3):228-39. doi: 10.1093/jnci/djr523. Epub 2012 Jan 13.

Abstract

Background: Mutations in the v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) play a critical role in cancer cell growth and resistance to therapy. Most mutations occur at codons 12 and 13. In colorectal cancer, the presence of any mutant KRas amino acid substitution is a negative predictor of patient response to targeted therapy. However, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the evidence that KRAS mutation is a predictive factor is conflicting.

Methods: We used data from a molecularly targeted clinical trial for 215 patients with tissues available out of 268 evaluable patients with refractory NSCLC to examine associations between specific mutant KRas proteins and progression-free survival and tumor gene expression. Transcriptome microarray studies of patient tumor samples and reverse-phase protein array studies of a panel of 67 NSCLC cell lines with known substitutions in KRas and in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells stably expressing different mutant KRas proteins were used to investigate signaling pathway activation. Molecular modeling was used to study the conformations of wild-type and mutant KRas proteins. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression were used to analyze survival data. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results: Patients whose tumors had either mutant KRas-Gly12Cys or mutant KRas-Gly12Val had worse progression-free survival compared with patients whose tumors had other mutant KRas proteins or wild-type KRas (P = .046, median survival = 1.84 months) compared with all other mutant KRas (median survival = 3.35 months) or wild-type KRas (median survival = 1.95 months). NSCLC cell lines with mutant KRas-Gly12Asp had activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3-K) and mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) signaling, whereas those with mutant KRas-Gly12Cys or mutant KRas-Gly12Val had activated Ral signaling and decreased growth factor-dependent Akt activation. Molecular modeling studies showed that different conformations imposed by mutant KRas may lead to altered association with downstream signaling transducers.

Conclusions: Not all mutant KRas proteins affect patient survival or downstream signaling in a similar way. The heterogeneous behavior of mutant KRas proteins implies that therapeutic interventions may need to take into account the specific mutant KRas expressed by the tumor.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Aspartic Acid
  • Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy
  • Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / genetics
  • Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / metabolism*
  • Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / mortality
  • Cell Line, Tumor
  • Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic
  • Cysteine
  • Disease-Free Survival
  • Gene Expression Profiling
  • Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
  • Genes, ras* / genetics
  • Genetic Vectors
  • Glycine
  • Humans
  • Immunoblotting
  • Immunoprecipitation
  • Kaplan-Meier Estimate
  • Lentivirus
  • Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • Lung Neoplasms / genetics
  • Lung Neoplasms / metabolism*
  • Lung Neoplasms / mortality
  • Microarray Analysis
  • Molecular Targeted Therapy*
  • Mutation*
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt / metabolism
  • Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
  • Signal Transduction*
  • TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases / metabolism
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Valine

Substances

  • Aspartic Acid
  • MTOR protein, human
  • TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt
  • Valine
  • Cysteine
  • Glycine