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Meta-Analysis
. 2012;7(2):e30920.
doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0030920. Epub 2012 Feb 3.

Introspective Minds: Using ALE Meta-Analyses to Study Commonalities in the Neural Correlates of Emotional Processing, Social & Unconstrained Cognition

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Free PMC article
Meta-Analysis

Introspective Minds: Using ALE Meta-Analyses to Study Commonalities in the Neural Correlates of Emotional Processing, Social & Unconstrained Cognition

Leonhard Schilbach et al. PLoS One. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Previous research suggests overlap between brain regions that show task-induced deactivations and those activated during the performance of social-cognitive tasks. Here, we present results of quantitative meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies, which confirm a statistical convergence in the neural correlates of social and resting state cognition. Based on the idea that both social and unconstrained cognition might be characterized by introspective processes, which are also thought to be highly relevant for emotional experiences, a third meta-analysis was performed investigating studies on emotional processing. By using conjunction analyses across all three sets of studies, we can demonstrate significant overlap of task-related signal change in dorso-medial prefrontal and medial parietal cortex, brain regions that have, indeed, recently been linked to introspective abilities. Our findings, therefore, provide evidence for the existence of a core neural network, which shows task-related signal change during socio-emotional tasks and during resting states.

Conflict of interest statement

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1. Significant results of the ALE meta-analysis for social cognition tasks (SOC).
All results are displayed on the left and right lateral surface view, the anterior/posterior and dorsal/ventral view of the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) single subject template. ATC: anterior temporal cortex, DMPFC: dorso-medial prefrontal cortex, MTG: middle temporal gyrus, PCC: posterior cingulate cortex, PREC: precuneus, TPJ: temporo-parietal junction.
Figure 2
Figure 2. Significant results of the ALE meta-analysis of emotional processing tasks (EMO).
All results are displayed on the left and right lateral surface view, the anterior/posterior and dorsal/ventral view of the MNI single subject template. ACC: anterior cingulate cortex, AMY: amygdala, DS: dorsal striatum, FG: fusiform gyrus, INS: insula cortex, PREC: precuneus, PCC: posterior cingulate cortex, VS: ventral striatum.
Figure 3
Figure 3. Significant results of the ALE meta-analysis of unconstrained cognition (DMN).
All results are displayed on the left and right lateral surface view, the anterior/posterior and dorsal/ventral view of the MNI single subject template. ACC: anterior cingulate cortex, MFG: middle frontal gyrus, PCC: posterior cingulate cortex, PREC: precuneus, SMG: supramarginal gyrus, TPJ: temporo-parietal junction, VMPFC: ventro-medial prefrontal cortex.
Figure 4
Figure 4. Significant results of the conjunction analysis of SOC ∩ EMO.
All results are displayed on the left and right lateral surface view, the anterior/posterior and dorsal/ventral view of the MNI single subject template. DMPFC: dorso-medial prefrontal cortex, PREC: precuneus, STG: superior temporal gyrus, VS: ventral striatum.
Figure 5
Figure 5. Significant results of the conjunction analysis of SOC ∩ DMN.
All results are displayed on the left and right lateral surface view, the anterior/posterior and dorsal/ventral view of the MNI single subject template. DMPFC: dorso-medial prefrontal cortex, PREC: precuneus, TPJ: temporo-parietal junction.
Figure 6
Figure 6. Significant results of the conjunction analysis of SOC ∩ EMO ∩ DMN.
All results are displayed on the left and right lateral surface view, the anterior/posterior and dorsal/ventral view of the MNI single subject template. DMPFC: dorso-medial prefrontal cortex, PREC: precuneus.

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