Y-family DNA polymerases and their role in tolerance of cellular DNA damage

Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2012 Feb 23;13(3):141-52. doi: 10.1038/nrm3289.

Abstract

The past 15 years have seen an explosion in our understanding of how cells replicate damaged DNA and how this can lead to mutagenesis. The Y-family DNA polymerases lie at the heart of this process, which is commonly known as translesion synthesis. This family of polymerases has unique features that enable them to synthesize DNA past damaged bases. However, as they exhibit low fidelity when copying undamaged DNA, it is essential that they are only called into play when they are absolutely required. Several layers of regulation ensure that this is achieved.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Bacterial Proteins / chemistry
  • Bacterial Proteins / metabolism
  • Bacterial Proteins / physiology
  • Catalytic Domain
  • DNA Damage*
  • DNA Repair
  • DNA Replication
  • Humans
  • Mutagenesis
  • Nucleotidyltransferases / chemistry
  • Nucleotidyltransferases / metabolism
  • Nucleotidyltransferases / physiology*
  • Protein Binding
  • Protein Structure, Tertiary

Substances

  • Bacterial Proteins
  • Nucleotidyltransferases