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. 2012 Jan;2(1):103-14.
doi: 10.1534/g3.111.001107. Epub 2012 Jan 1.

Strain Variation in the Transcriptome of the Dengue Fever Vector, Aedes Aegypti

Free PMC article

Strain Variation in the Transcriptome of the Dengue Fever Vector, Aedes Aegypti

Mariangela Bonizzoni et al. G3 (Bethesda). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Studies of transcriptome dynamics provide a basis for understanding functional elements of the genome and the complexity of gene regulation. The dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti, exhibits great adaptability to diverse ecological conditions, is phenotypically polymorphic, and shows variation in vectorial capacity to arboviruses. Previous genome sequencing showed richness in repetitive DNA and transposable elements that can contribute to genome plasticity. Population genetic studies revealed a varying degree of worldwide genetic polymorphism. However, the extent of functional genetic polymorphism across strains is unknown. The transcriptomes of three Ae. aegypti strains, Chetumal (CTM), Rexville D-Puerto Rico (Rex-D) and Liverpool (LVP), were compared. CTM is more susceptible than Rex- D to infection by dengue virus serotype 2. A total of 4188 transcripts exhibit either no or small variation (<2-fold) among sugar-fed samples of the three strains and between sugar- and blood-fed samples within each strain, corresponding most likely to genes encoding products necessary for vital functions. Transcripts enriched in blood-fed mosquitoes encode proteins associated with catalytic activities, molecular transport, metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and amino acids, and functions related to blood digestion and the progression of the gonotropic cycle. Significant qualitative and quantitative differences were found in individual transcripts among strains including differential representation of paralogous gene products. The majority of immunity-associated transcripts decreased in accumulation after a bloodmeal and the results are discussed in relation to the different susceptibility of CTM and Rex-D mosquitoes to DENV2 infection.

Keywords: Aedes aegypti; RNA-seq; bloodmeal; strain variation.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Comparison of function−parent attribution for transcripts for basal metabolism and transcripts highly differentially accumulated after a bloodmeal. Functional parent attribution of the transcripts (A) either not differentially accumulated or minimally accumulated (≤ 2-fold) after a bloodmeal and between sugar-fed mosquitoes of two strains, (B) significantly found only in B mosquitoes, (C) the top 1%, and (D) 5% of transcripts with the greatest-fold changes in accumulation between B and S mosquitoes in all three strains. The number of transcripts considered in each panel is on the bottom-right corner.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Venn diagram showing transcripts accumulated differentially between S and B mosquitoes 5 hPBM (A) and significantly found only in S or B mosquitoes (B) among the three Ae. aegypti strains analyzed.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Percentages of functional group classifications for the transcripts accumulated differentially at 5 hPBM (A) and related to basal metabolism (B). Functional groups abbreviations are as follows: cytoskeleton and structural (CS), diverse function (DIV), protein turnover and chaperones (PT), defense mechanism (DM), transport and metabolism of lipids, carbohydrate and amino acids (TMLCA), transport and intracellular trafficking (TRP), unknown (UNK), transcription, translation, posttranslational modification and RNA processing (TTPMR), and signal transduction mechanism (STM). Data relative to transcripts found expressed only in B or S mosquitoes are included with those related to transcripts increased or decreased, respectively, following a blood meal.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Immunity-related transcripts. The significant fold-changes in accumulation 5 hPBM between B and S mosquitoes for SRRP members (1−27) and transcripts associated with peroxidase activity (28−44) are shown in the Ae. aegypti strain LVP (red), CTM (blue), and Rex-D (green). The asterisk indicates transcripts with ≤100 RNA-seq reads mapping in both the S and B sample.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Fatty acid biosynthesis and elongation in mitochondria. Proteins corresponding to transcripts accumulated in a strain-specific manner are circled in a color corresponding to the strain and condition defined in the legend (panels A and B).

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