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Comparative Study
. 2012 Mar 5;17(3):2704-13.
doi: 10.3390/molecules17032704.

Antibacterial Activity and Anticancer Activity of Rosmarinus Officinalis L. Essential Oil Compared to That of Its Main Components

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Free PMC article
Comparative Study

Antibacterial Activity and Anticancer Activity of Rosmarinus Officinalis L. Essential Oil Compared to That of Its Main Components

Wei Wang et al. Molecules. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

In this study, Rosmarinus officinalis L. essential oil and three of its main components 1,8-cineole (27.23%), α-pinene (19.43%) and β-pinene (6.71%) were evaluated for their in vitro antibacterial activities and toxicology properties. R. officinalis L. essential oil possessed similar antibacterial activities to α-pinene, and a little bit better than β-pinene, while 1,8-cineole possessed the lowest antibacterial activities. R. officinalis L. essential oil exhibited the strongest cytotoxicity towards three human cancer cells. Its inhibition concentration 50% (IC₅₀) values on SK-OV-3, HO-8910 and Bel-7402 were 0.025‰, 0.076‰ and 0.13‰ (v/v), respectively. The cytotoxicity of all the test samples on SK-OV-3 was significantly stronger than on HO-8910 and Bel-7402. In general, R. officinalis L. essential oil showed greater activity than its components in both antibacterial and anticancer test systems, and the activities were mostly related to their concentrations.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Time-kill curves of R. officinalis L. essential oil and three of its main components towards Staphylococcus aureus. (A) The concentrations used for R. officinalis L. essential oil were: 0.0313% (MIC) and 0.0625% (2MIC, MBC); (B) The concentrations used for α-pinene were MIC (0.0313%), 2MIC (0.0625%) and MBC (0.125%); (C) The concentrations used for β-pinene were MIC (0.0313%), 2MIC (0.0625%) and MBC (0.125%); (D) The concentrations used for 1,8-cineole were MIC (1.25%), 2MIC (2.5%) and MBC (5%). The control did not contain essential oil.
Figure 1
Figure 1
Time-kill curves of R. officinalis L. essential oil and three of its main components towards Staphylococcus aureus. (A) The concentrations used for R. officinalis L. essential oil were: 0.0313% (MIC) and 0.0625% (2MIC, MBC); (B) The concentrations used for α-pinene were MIC (0.0313%), 2MIC (0.0625%) and MBC (0.125%); (C) The concentrations used for β-pinene were MIC (0.0313%), 2MIC (0.0625%) and MBC (0.125%); (D) The concentrations used for 1,8-cineole were MIC (1.25%), 2MIC (2.5%) and MBC (5%). The control did not contain essential oil.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Dose-dependent cytotoxicity of R. officinalis L. essential oil and three of its main components (1,8-cineole, α-pinene and β-pinene; 48 h exposure) towards SK-OV-3 (A), HO-8910 (B) and Bel-7402 (C) cell lines as determined by the MTT assay. Values are expressed as means ± SD of three independent experiments. Standard deviations were less than 10%.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Dose-dependent cytotoxicity of R. officinalis L. essential oil and three of its main components (1,8-cineole, α-pinene and β-pinene; 48 h exposure) towards SK-OV-3 (A), HO-8910 (B) and Bel-7402 (C) cell lines as determined by the MTT assay. Values are expressed as means ± SD of three independent experiments. Standard deviations were less than 10%.

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