Assessing mortality risk in very low birth weight infants

Med Arh. 2012;66(2):76-9. doi: 10.5455/medarh.2012.66.76-79.

Abstract

Introduction: Preterm birth is the most important univariant risk factor of neonatal mortality. Assessment of risk factors affecting mortality in preterm infants with very low birth weight is important for the treatment of this highly vulnerable population.

Objective: Detection of risk factors for neonatal mortality in very low birth weight premature infants.

Methods: The current study was conducted in a tertiary research and educational hospital, NICU, Pediatric Clinic KCU Sarajevo, from January 2010 to December 2010. After admission CRIB score was determined to every hospitalized infant with birth weight < 1500 g, born before the full 31 weeks of gestation (30 weeks + 6 days). We also gathered information about the Apgar score in 5th minute, gender, presence of respiratory distress syndrome and hemodynamic stability. 67 infants fulfilled inclusion criteria.

Results: Mean birth weight was 1136.4 g +/- 250.9, range 550-1500 g. Mean gestational age was 27.29 weeks +/-1.97, range 22-30 weeks. Mean CRIB score was 3.22, range 0-18. Twenty VLBW infants out of 67 died (29.85%). There was significant difference between groups of survived and dead infants regarding gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, Crib score, base excess, presence of respiratory distress syndrome and hemodynamic stability at the birth.

Conclusion: CRIB score, birth weight, gestational age, base excess, Apgar score, respiratory distress syndrome and hemodynamic instability are valuable predictors for a neonatal mortality in population of preterm infants with very low birth weight.

MeSH terms

  • Apgar Score
  • Birth Weight
  • Gestational Age
  • Humans
  • Infant Mortality*
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infant, Very Low Birth Weight*
  • Risk Assessment