Epithelial self-defense against cancer

Cell Res. 2012 Nov;22(11):1527-9. doi: 10.1038/cr.2012.69. Epub 2012 Apr 24.

Abstract

It is not clearly understood what happens at the interface between normal and transformed epithelial cells at the first step of carcinogenesis. A recent study reveals that the organized epithelial structure suppresses clonal expansion of transformed cells. Translocation from the epithelium or perturbation of intercellular adhesions may be required for transformed cells to evade the suppressive environments.

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Cell Adhesion
  • Cell Line
  • Cell Transformation, Neoplastic*
  • Cellular Microenvironment
  • Drosophila Proteins / genetics
  • Drosophila Proteins / metabolism
  • Drosophila melanogaster
  • Epithelial Cells / cytology
  • Epithelial Cells / physiology*
  • Humans
  • Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors
  • Matrix Metalloproteinases / metabolism
  • Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases / metabolism
  • Neoplasms / pathology*
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt / metabolism
  • Receptor, ErbB-2 / biosynthesis
  • Receptor, ErbB-2 / genetics
  • Tumor Suppressor Proteins / genetics
  • Tumor Suppressor Proteins / metabolism

Substances

  • Drosophila Proteins
  • Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors
  • Tumor Suppressor Proteins
  • l(2)gl protein, Drosophila
  • ERBB2 protein, human
  • Receptor, ErbB-2
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt
  • Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
  • Matrix Metalloproteinases