Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Comparative Study
. 2013 Apr;180(2):185-90.
doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2012.04.021. Epub 2012 May 3.

Comparison of Pediatric Appendectomy Outcomes Between Pediatric Surgeons and General Surgery Residents

Affiliations
Comparative Study

Comparison of Pediatric Appendectomy Outcomes Between Pediatric Surgeons and General Surgery Residents

Ido Mizrahi et al. J Surg Res. .

Abstract

Background: Appendectomy is the most common urgent procedure in children, and surgical outcomes may be affected by the surgeon's experience. This study's aim is to compare appendectomy outcomes performed by pediatric surgeons (PSs) and general surgery residents (GSRs).

Materials and methods: A retrospective review of all patients younger than 16y treated for appendicitis at two different campuses of the same institution during the years 2008-2009 was performed. Appendectomies were performed by PS in one campus and GSR in the other. Primary end points included postoperative morbidity and hospital length of stay.

Results: During the study period, 246 (61%) patients were operated by senior GSR (postgraduate year 5-7) versus 157 (39%) patients by PS. There was no significant difference in patients' characteristics at presentation to the emergency room and the rate of appendeceal perforation (11% versus 15%, P=0.32), and noninfectious appendicitis (5% versus 5% P=0.78) also was similar. Laparoscopic surgery was performed more commonly by GSR (16% versus 9%, P=0.02) with shorter operating time (54±1.5 versus 60±2.1, P=0.01). Interestingly, the emergency room to operating room time was shorter for GSR group (419±14 versus 529±24min, P<0.001). The hospital length of stay was shorter for the GSR group (4.0±0.2 versus 4.5±0.2, P=0.03), and broad-spectrum antibiotics were used less commonly (20% versus 53%, P<0.0001) and so was home antibiotics continuation (13% versus 30%, P<0.0001). Nevertheless, postoperative complication rate was similar (5% versus 7%, P=0.29) and so was the rate of readmissions (2% versus 5%, P=0.52).

Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the presence of a PS does not affect the outcomes of appendectomies.

Comment in

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 7 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

Publication types

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback