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Review
, 30 Suppl 2, B18-25

Meningococcal Vaccine Development--From Glycoconjugates Against MenACWY to Proteins Against MenB--potential for Broad Protection Against Meningococcal Disease

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Review

Meningococcal Vaccine Development--From Glycoconjugates Against MenACWY to Proteins Against MenB--potential for Broad Protection Against Meningococcal Disease

Peter M Dull et al. Vaccine.

Abstract

Novartis Vaccines has a long-standing research and development interest in the prevention of invasive meningococcal disease. From the initial licensure of the monovalent meningococcal C glycoconjugate vaccine, Menjugate(®), in response to the emergence of a virulent serogroup C ST-11 strain in the United Kingdom to the more recent development and licensure of a quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY glycoconjugate vaccine, Menveo(®), Novartis has a continuing commitment to the development of more effective tools for the control of meningococcal disease. Menveo is now licensed for use in adolescents and adults in over 50 countries and results from phase III studies have shown the vaccine to be well-tolerated and highly immunogenic in infants with vaccination beginning from 2 months of age. The 'holy grail' of meningococcal disease control is a broadly protective vaccine against serogroup B (MenB), preferably a vaccine that protects all age groups including infants. As the serogroup B capsule is poorly immunogenic, efforts over the past 40 years have focused on identifying conserved proteins expressed on the bacterial surface that elicit bactericidal antibodies. Novartis has approached this problem utilizing genomic tools to identify proteins meeting these criteria in a process now known as 'reverse vaccinology'[1]. This process has resulted in a novel multicomponent MenB vaccine (4CMenB) that consists of four major immunogenic components (three subcapsular MenB protein antigens plus outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) which themselves provide multiple subcapsular antigens, the immunodominant one being PorA). These all induce bactericidal antibodies against the antigens that are important in determining the survival, function, and virulence of the meningococci. Phase II studies of 4CMenB have been completed and have demonstrated that the vaccine is highly immunogenic against reference meningococcal strains selected to support licensure. Post-vaccination sera from clinical studies have also been tested against a diverse panel of serogroup B strains to support the development of the Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS), a tool used to predict vaccine strain coverage [2] This overview is intended to give a broad summary of the key clinical data derived from the Menveo and 4CMenB clinical development programs.

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