Endogenous angiotensin II regulates hepatic angiotensinogen production

Life Sci. 1990;47(25):2343-9. doi: 10.1016/0024-3205(90)90273-t.

Abstract

We have investigated the effects of endogenous angiotensin II (ANG II) on hepatic angiotensinogen mRNA levels in rats. Changes in endogenous ANG II were induced by various sodium intakes (standard-, low-, and high-sodium) or by enalapril treatment. In a low sodium state for 2 weeks, angiotensinogen mRNA levels and plasma ANG II concentration increased 1.3-fold and 1.6-fold compared to those in standard sodium state, respectively. In a high sodium state, angiotensinogen mRNA levels and plasma ANG II concentration decreased by 42% and 56% compared to the standard sodierm state, respectively. Four hours after treatment with enalapril (3 mg/kg), angiotensinogen mRNA level and plasma ANG II concentration decreased by 25% and 12% compared to the standard sodium state, respectively. There was a close correlation between angiotensinogen mRNA level and plasma ANG II concentration (r = 0.79, P less than 0.01). These results suggest that endogenous ANG II may play an important role in the regulation of hepatic angiotensinogen synthesis.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Angiotensin II / blood*
  • Angiotensinogen / biosynthesis*
  • Angiotensinogen / genetics
  • Animals
  • Enalapril / pharmacology
  • Liver / drug effects
  • Liver / metabolism*
  • Male
  • RNA, Messenger / metabolism
  • Rats
  • Rats, Inbred Strains
  • Sodium / administration & dosage
  • Sodium / pharmacology

Substances

  • RNA, Messenger
  • Angiotensinogen
  • Angiotensin II
  • Enalapril
  • Sodium