Iron, radiation, and cancer

Environ Health Perspect. 1990 Jul;87:291-300. doi: 10.1289/ehp.9087291.

Abstract

Increased iron content of cells and tissue may increase the risk of cancer. In particular, high available iron status may increase the risk of a radiation-induced cancer. There are two possible mechanisms for this effect: iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals, and it may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and development of a transformed cell in vivo. Given the high available iron content of the western diet and the fact that the world is changing to the western model, it is important to determine if high iron increases the risk of cancer.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Biological Availability
  • Cell Line
  • Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / drug effects
  • Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / metabolism
  • Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / radiation effects
  • Cocarcinogenesis*
  • Cricetinae
  • Cricetulus
  • Diet / adverse effects
  • Free Radicals
  • Humans
  • Hydrogen Peroxide / metabolism
  • Iron / adverse effects*
  • Iron / deficiency
  • Iron / pharmacokinetics
  • Leukemia, Radiation-Induced / etiology
  • Leukemia, Radiation-Induced / metabolism
  • Neoplasms / etiology*
  • Neoplasms / metabolism
  • Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / etiology*
  • Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / metabolism
  • Oxidation-Reduction
  • Oxygen / metabolism
  • Radiation Tolerance
  • Risk Factors

Substances

  • Free Radicals
  • Hydrogen Peroxide
  • Iron
  • Oxygen