Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2012 May;19(2):115-20.
doi: 10.4103/0971-6580.97198.

Safety Evaluation of Alcoholic Extract of Boswellia Ovalifoliolata Stem-bark in Rats

Affiliations
Free PMC article

Safety Evaluation of Alcoholic Extract of Boswellia Ovalifoliolata Stem-bark in Rats

P R Sakuntala Devi et al. Toxicol Int. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The safety profile of alcoholic extract of stem-bark of B. ovalifoliolata was investigated in male Wistar albino rats as per OECD guidelines 407. A total of 24 male Wistar rats were divided into four groups of six rats each. Group 1 served as control and was given 0.3% carboxymethylcellulose, groups 2, 3 and 4 were given alcoholic extract of B. ovalifoliolata @ 100, 500 and 1000 mg/kg respectively in 0.3% carboxymethylcellulose orally for 28 days. The animals were observed daily for clinical signs, mortality, physiological and behavioral changes. Body weights were measured at weekly intervals and various hematological parameters like Hb, PCV, TEC, TLC and serum biochemical profile which included AST, ALT, creatine phosphokinase, creatinine, total protein and antioxidant parameters like TBARS and GSH in liver were estimated at the end of experimental period. There were no clinical signs of abnormality. The weekly body weights, organ weights and hematological parameters did not vary significantly amongst the groups. The mean activity of AST, ALT and CPK, and the concentration of serum creatinine, total protein, TBARS and GSH did not differ significantly among the groups. Histological abnormalities of toxicological significance were not detected in groups 2 and 3. However, mild histopathological alterations were observed in higher dose group 4. In conclusion, the present study revealed that the alcoholic extract of stem-bark of B. ovalifoliolata is safe at lower doses of 100 and 500 mg/kg. Hence, alcoholic extract of stem bark of B. ovalifoliolata is safe and no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) is found to be 500 mg/kg following repeated oral administration for 28 days in rats.

Keywords: B. ovalifoliolata; hematology; oxidative stress; safety evaluation; serum biochemistry.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of Interest: None declared.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Group 4 liver showing mild proliferation of bile duct (H and E, ×70)
Figure 2
Figure 2
Group 4 kidney section showing mild necrotic changes in tubular epithelial cells (H and E, ×70)
Figure 3
Figure 3
Group 4 heart section showing mild congestion (H and E, ×70)
Figure 4
Figure 4
Group 4 testis showing interlobular edema and severe necrotic changes in seminiferous tubular epithelial cells (H and E, ×70)
Figure 5
Figure 5
Group 4 stomach showing the desquamation of lining epithelial cells

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 6 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Oduola T, Popoola GB, Avwioro OG, Oduola TA, Ademosun AA, Lawal MO. Use of Jatropha gossypifolia stem latex as a haemostatic agent: How safe is it? J Med Plants Res. 2007;1:014–17.
    1. Aboyade O, Yakubu M, Grierson D, Afolayan A. Studies on the toxicological effect of the aqueous extract of the fresh, dried and boiled berries of Solanum aculeastrum Dunal in male Wistar rats. Hum Exp Toxicol. 2009;28:765–75. - PubMed
    1. Jou-fang D. Clinical toxicity of Herbal medicine in Taiwan. 7th International Conference on Health problems related to the Chinese. 1994
    1. Olaleye MT. Cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity of methanolic extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa. J Med Plants Res. 2007;1:9–13.
    1. Pullaiah T. Medicinal plants in A.P (India) New Delhi: Regency publications; 2002. p. 51.
Feedback