Kinesins and cancer

Nat Rev Cancer. 2012 Jul 24;12(8):527-39. doi: 10.1038/nrc3310.

Abstract

Kinesins are a family of molecular motors that travel unidirectionally along microtubule tracks to fulfil their many roles in intracellular transport or cell division. Over the past few years kinesins that are involved in mitosis have emerged as potential targets for cancer drug development. Several compounds that inhibit two mitotic kinesins (EG5 (also known as KIF11) and centromere-associated protein E (CENPE)) have entered Phase I and II clinical trials either as monotherapies or in combination with other drugs. Additional mitotic kinesins are currently being validated as drug targets, raising the possibility that the range of kinesin-based drug targets may expand in the future.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology
  • Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use
  • Clinical Trials, Phase I as Topic
  • Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic
  • Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
  • Humans
  • Kinesin / antagonists & inhibitors*
  • Kinesin / metabolism*
  • Mitosis / drug effects*
  • Neoplasms / drug therapy*
  • Neoplasms / enzymology*

Substances

  • Antineoplastic Agents
  • Kinesin