Physical activity and depression symptoms among pregnant women from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006

J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2012 Mar;41(2):227-235. doi: 10.1111/j.1552-6909.2012.01340.x.

Abstract

Objective: To examine the association between objectively measured physical activity and depression symptoms among a nationally representative sample of pregnant women to provide a more accurate understanding of the relationship between physical activity and depression symptoms.

Design: We employed a cross-sectional study design.

Setting: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006 were used for this study.

Methods: One-hundred and forty-one pregnant women wore an ActiGraph accelerometer for 7 days and completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 to assess depression status.

Results: More than 19% of the participants experienced some depression symptoms, and compared to their counterparts not having depression symptoms, they were less physically active.

Conclusion: An inverse association was found between physical activity and depression symptoms among pregnant women. When feasible, nurses are encouraged to help facilitate physical activity among pregnant women, assuming an uncomplicated pregnancy.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Age Distribution
  • Analysis of Variance
  • Body Mass Index
  • Confidence Intervals
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Depressive Disorder / diagnosis*
  • Depressive Disorder / epidemiology*
  • Ethnic Groups / statistics & numerical data
  • Exercise / physiology
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Logistic Models
  • Motor Activity*
  • Nutrition Surveys
  • Odds Ratio
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy Outcome
  • Pregnant Women / ethnology
  • Pregnant Women / psychology*
  • Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
  • Risk Assessment
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • United States
  • Young Adult