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. 2012 Jul;4(7):499-508.
doi: 10.18632/aging.100474.

The Lifespan Extension Effects of Resveratrol Are Conserved in the Honey Bee and May Be Driven by a Mechanism Related to Caloric Restriction

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Free PMC article

The Lifespan Extension Effects of Resveratrol Are Conserved in the Honey Bee and May Be Driven by a Mechanism Related to Caloric Restriction

Brenda Rascón et al. Aging (Albany NY). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Our interest in healthy aging and in evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of lifespan extension prompted us to investigate whether features of age-related decline in the honey bee could be attenuated with resveratrol. Resveratrol is regarded as a caloric restriction mimetic known to extend lifespan in some but not all model species. The current, prevailing view is that resveratrol works largely by activating signaling pathways. It has also been suggested that resveratrol may act as an antioxidant and confer protection against nervous system impairment and oxidative stress. To test whether honey bee lifespan, learning performance, and food perception could be altered by resveratrol, we supplemented the diets of honey bees and measured lifespan, olfactory learning, and gustatory responsiveness to sucrose. Furthermore, to test the effects of resveratrol under metabolic challenge, we used hyperoxic environments to generate oxidative stress. Under normal oxygen conditions, two resveratrol treatments-30 and 130 μM-lengthened average lifespan in wild-type honey bees by 38% and 33%, respectively. Both resveratrol treatments also lengthened maximum and median lifespan. In contrast, hyperoxic stress abolished the resveratrol life-extension response. Furthermore, resveratrol did not affect learning performance, but did alter gustation. Honey bees that were not fed resveratrol exhibited greater responsiveness to sugar, while those supplemented with resveratrol were less responsive to sugar. We also discovered that individuals fed a high dose of resveratrol-compared to controls-ingested fewer quantities of food under ad libitum feeding conditions.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors of this manuscript have no conflict of interest to declare.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Resveratrol does not affect learning performance in 9-day-old honey bees in normoxic conditions (Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA: H ( 2, N= 350) =1.529602 P =0.465). Data shown as mean±SE.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Gustatory responsiveness is altered by resveratrol in 9-day-old honey bees in normoxic conditions (Kruskall-Wallis ANOVA: H (2, 566)=11.363, N=578, P=0.003). Data shown as mean±SE. Identical letters indicate that groups are not significantly different from one another at an alpha significance level of 5% for the Mann-Whitney U test.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Honey bees show decreased survival rates in hyperoxia regardless of resveratrol dosage, compared to normoxic controls (Cox's F-test: F(328, 238)=2.69, P<0.01).
Figure 4
Figure 4
Under normal oxygen conditions, resveratrol extends lifespan in 9-day-old honey bees (Multi-group survival test: χ2 =11.72, df=2, N=130, P<0.01). Both 30 and 130 μM resveratrol treatments increased average lifespan in wild-type honey bees by 38% and 33%, respectively. Resveratrol treatments also lengthened maximum and median lifespan. Differences considered significant if P < 0.05.
Figure 5
Figure 5
The life-lengthening effect of resveratrol, previously seen in normoxia, is abolished under sub-optimal conditions of hyperoxia (Multi-group survival test: χ2 =4.08, df=2, N=60, P=0.130).
Figure 6
Figure 6
Resveratrol affects food consumption in a dose-dependent fashion in 9-day-old honey bees in normoxic conditions (Mann-Whitney: U=775, N1=49, N2=46, P=0.008). Data shown as mean±SE. The star denotes significant differences between the groups.

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