Number of aberrant crypt foci in the rectum is a useful surrogate marker of colorectal adenoma recurrence

Dig Endosc. 2012 Sep;24(5):353-7. doi: 10.1111/j.1443-1661.2012.01289.x. Epub 2012 Apr 2.

Abstract

Aim: Endoscopic screening and removal of colorectal adenomas can reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer. However, given the possibility of adenoma recurrence, surveillance colonoscopy is currently recommended after the initial screening and removal of colorectal adenomas. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) have been shown to serve as a reliable surrogate marker of colorectal carcinogenesis. In this study, the relationship between the number of ACF at the initial endoscopic polypectomy and the likelihood of colorectal adenoma recurrence after polypectomy were investigated.

Methods: High-magnification chromoscopic colonoscopy was performed in 82 subjects who underwent endoscopic polypectomy to identify ACF in the lower rectum. Surveillance colonoscopy was then performed 3 years after the baseline polypectomy at Yokohama City University Hospital.

Results: The number of ACF was greater in patients who showed adenoma recurrence (7.88 ± 6.35) than in those who did not (2.19 ± 2.95) (P < 0.001). Receiver-operating curve analysis showed that the number of ACF was a highly specific predictor of the risk of adenoma recurrence.

Conclusions: This is the first study conducted to investigate the relationship between the number of ACF after endoscopic polypectomy and the likelihood of recurrence of colorectal adenomas. These results suggest that the number of ACF is a useful predictor of the likelihood of colorectal adenoma recurrence.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Aberrant Crypt Foci / pathology*
  • Adenoma / pathology*
  • Aged
  • Colonoscopes*
  • Colonoscopy / methods*
  • Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology*
  • Diagnosis, Differential
  • Equipment Design
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Japan / epidemiology
  • Male
  • Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology
  • Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology*
  • Retrospective Studies