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, 27 (10), 1276-82

Caffeine and Risk of Parkinson's Disease in a Large Cohort of Men and Women

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Caffeine and Risk of Parkinson's Disease in a Large Cohort of Men and Women

Natalia Palacios et al. Mov Disord.

Abstract

Caffeine consumption has been associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). The association is strong and consistent in men, but uncertain in women, possibly because of an interaction with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We sought to confirm these findings using data on PD incidence in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort (CPS II-Nutrition), a large, prospective study of men and women. We conducted a prospective study of caffeine intake and risk of PD within the CPS II Nutrition Cohort. Intakes of coffee and other sources of caffeine were assessed at baseline. Incident cases of PD (n = 317; 197 men and 120 women) were confirmed by treating physicians and medical record review. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated using proportional hazards models, adjusting for age, smoking, and alcohol consumption. After adjustment for age, smoking, and alcohol intake, high caffeine consumption was associated with a reduced risk of PD. The RR comparing the 5th to the 1st quintile of caffeine intake was 0.43 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.26, 0.71; P trend = <0.002) in men, and 0.61 (95% CI: 0.34, 1.09; P trend = 0.05) in women. Among women, this association was stronger among never users of HRT (RR = 0.32) than among ever users (RR = 0.81; P interaction = 0.15). Consumption of decaffeinated coffee was not associated with PD risk. Findings from this large, prospective study of men and women are consistent with a protective effect of caffeine intake on PD incidence, with an attenuating influence of HRT in women. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

Conflict of interest statement

Financial Disclosures/Conflicts of Interest:

Natalia Palacios is supported by the NIH K01 award ES019183-01.

Xiang Gao has received research support from the NIH/NINDS and has reported consultant relationship with Teva.

Marji McCullough has nothing to disclose.

Michael Schwarzschild’s work is funded by the NIH grant K24NS060991 and DoD grant W81XWH-11-1-0150.

Roma Shah has nothing to disclose.

Susan Gapstur has nothing to disclose.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Relative risk (95% confidence intervals) of Parkinson Disease According to Quintiles of Intake of Caffeine at Baseline (A) Men and (B) Women **adjusted for age, smoking (pack years in 1992 and yes/no in 1999), and alcohol intake (1999)
Figure 1
Figure 1
Relative risk (95% confidence intervals) of Parkinson Disease According to Quintiles of Intake of Caffeine at Baseline (A) Men and (B) Women **adjusted for age, smoking (pack years in 1992 and yes/no in 1999), and alcohol intake (1999)

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