Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2012 Sep 1;11:50.
doi: 10.1186/1475-9276-11-50.

Can Financial Insecurity and Condescending Treatment Explain the Higher Prevalence of Poor Self-Rated Health in Women Than in Men? A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study in Sweden

Affiliations
Free PMC article

Can Financial Insecurity and Condescending Treatment Explain the Higher Prevalence of Poor Self-Rated Health in Women Than in Men? A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study in Sweden

Anu Molarius et al. Int J Equity Health. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Introduction: Women have in general poorer self-rated health than men. Both material and psychosocial conditions have been found to be associated with self-rated health. We investigated whether two such factors, financial insecurity and condescending treatment, could explain the difference in self-rated health between women and men.

Methods: The association between the two factors and self-rated health was investigated in a population-based sample of 35,018 respondents. The data were obtained using a postal survey questionnaire sent to a random sample of men and women aged 18-75 years in 2008. The area covers 55 municipalities in central Sweden and the overall response rate was 59%. Multinomial odds ratios for poor self-rated health were calculated adjusting for age, educational level and longstanding illness and in the final model also for financial insecurity and condescending treatment.

Results: The prevalence of poor self-rated health was 7.4% among women and 6.0% among men. Women reported more often financial insecurity and condescending treatment than men did. The odds ratio for poor self-rated health in relation to good self-rated health was 1.29 (95% CI: 1.17-1.42) for women compared to men when adjusted for age, educational level and longstanding illness. The association became, however, statistically non-significant when adjusted for financial insecurity and condescending treatment.

Conclusion: The present findings suggest that women would have as good self-rated health as men if they had similar financial security as men and were not treated in a condescending manner to a larger extent than men. Longitudinal studies are, however, required to confirm this conclusion.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 8 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Closing the Gap in a generation; health equity through action on the social determinants of health. Final Report of the Commission on Social Determinants of Health. World Health Organization, CSDH, Geneve; 2008. - PubMed
    1. Idler EL, Benyamini Y. Self-rated health and mortality: a review of twenty-seven community studies. J Health Soc Behav. 1997;38:21–27. doi: 10.2307/2955359. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Kaplan GA, Goldberg DE, Everson SA, Cohen RD, Salonen R, Tuomilehto J, Salonen J. Perceived health status and morbidity and mortality: evidence from the Kuopio Ischeamic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. Int J Epidemiol. 1996;25:259–265. doi: 10.1093/ije/25.2.259. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Burström B, Fredlund P. Self rated health: is it as good a predictor of subsequent mortality among adults in lower as well as in higher social classes? J Epidemiol Community Health. 2001;55:836–840. doi: 10.1136/jech.55.11.836. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Nielsen AB, Siersma V, Hjort LC, Drivsholm T, Kreiner S, Hollnagel H. Self-rated general health among 40-year-old Danes and its association with all-cause mortality at 10-, 20-, and 29 years' follow-up. Scand J Public Health. 2008;36:3–11. - PubMed

Publication types

MeSH terms

Feedback