Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 84 (1), 283-96

Early Attachment Organization With Both Parents and Future Behavior Problems: From Infancy to Middle Childhood

Affiliations

Early Attachment Organization With Both Parents and Future Behavior Problems: From Infancy to Middle Childhood

Grazyna Kochanska et al. Child Dev.

Abstract

Links between children's attachment security with mothers and fathers, assessed in Strange Situation with each parent at 15 months (N = 101), and their future behavior problems were examined. Mothers and fathers rated children's behavior problems, and children reported their own behavior problems at age 8 (N = 86). Teachers rated behavior problems at age 6½ (N = 86). Insecurity with both parents had a robust effect: "Double-insecure" children reported more overall problems, and were rated by teachers as having more externalizing problems than those secure with at least 1 parent. Security with either parent could offset such risks, and security with both conferred no additional benefits. High resistance toward both parents in Strange Situation may confer "dual risk" for future externalizing behavior.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Children’s attachment security with fathers at 15 months moderates the effect of security with mothers at 15 months on children’s self-reported total behavior problems at age 8. Children’s gender was covaried. Solid line represents a significant simple slope; dashed line represents a non-significant simple slope.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Children’s attachment security with mothers at 15 months moderates the effect of security with fathers at 15 months on children’s self-reported total behavior problems at age 8. Children’s gender was covaried. Solid line represents a significant simple slope; dashed line represents a non-significant simple slope.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Children’s resistance with fathers at 15 months moderates the effect of resistance with mothers at 15 months on children’s teacher-reported externalizing problems at age 6 ½. Children’s gender was covaried. Solid line represents a significant simple slope; dashed line represents a non-significant simple slope.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 19 PubMed Central articles

See all "Cited by" articles

Publication types

Feedback