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Controlled Clinical Trial
. 2012 Sep 26;11:79.
doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-11-79.

Diverse Effects of a Low Dose Supplement of Lipidated Curcumin in Healthy Middle Aged People

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Free PMC article
Controlled Clinical Trial

Diverse Effects of a Low Dose Supplement of Lipidated Curcumin in Healthy Middle Aged People

Robert A DiSilvestro et al. Nutr J. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: Curcumin extracts of turmeric are proposed to produce health benefits. To date, human intervention studies have focused mainly on people with existing health problems given high doses of poorly absorbed curcumin. The purpose of the current study was to check whether in healthy people, a low dose of a lipidated curcumin extract could alter wellness-related measures.

Methods: The present study was conducted in healthy middle aged people (40-60 years old) with a low dose of curcumin (80 mg/day) in a lipidated form expected to have good absorption. Subjects were given either curcumin (N = 19) or placebo (N = 19) for 4 wk. Blood and saliva samples were taken before and after the 4 weeks and analyzed for a variety of blood and saliva measures relevant to health promotion.

Results: Curcumin, but not placebo, produced the following statistically significant changes: lowering of plasma triglyceride values, lowering of salivary amylase levels, raising of salivary radical scavenging capacities, raising of plasma catalase activities, lowering of plasma beta amyloid protein concentrations, lowering of plasma sICAM readings, increased plasma myeloperoxidase without increased c-reactive protein levels, increased plasma nitric oxide, and decreased plasma alanine amino transferase activities.

Conclusion: Collectively, these results demonstrate that a low dose of a curcumin-lipid preparation can produce a variety of potentially health promoting effects in healthy middle aged people.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Curcumin effects on plasma triglycerides and cholesterol concentrations (mg/dl). Values are means ± SEM for N = 19 pre- and post-treatment of 4 weeks. *Significantly different from pre-value, paired t-test, p < 0.05.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Curcumin effects on plasma concentrations of nitric oxide (μM x 10) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)(ng/ml). Values are means ± SEM for N = 19 pre- and post-treatment of 4 weeks. *Significantly different from pre-value, paired t-test, p < 0.05.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Curcumin effects on plasma concentrations of myeloperoxidase (ng/ml) and c-reactive protein (mg/L x 10). Values are means ± SEM for N = 19 pre- and post-treatment of 4 weeks. *Significantly different from pre-value, paired t-test, p < 0.05.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Curcumin effects on saliva activities of amylase (U/L) and antioxidant status (μM of copper reducing equivalents). Values are means ± SEM for N = 19 pre- and post-treatment of 4 weeks. *Significantly different from pre-value, paired t-test, p < 0.05.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Curcumin effects on plasma activities of catalase (U/ml) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (U/ml packed cells x 10-2). Values are means ± SEM for N = 19 pre- and post-treatment of 4 weeks. *Significantly different from pre-value, paired t-test, p < 0.01.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Curcumin effects on plasma activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (U/L) and beta amyloid protein (pmoles/L). Values are means ± SEM for N = 19 pre- and post-treatment of 4 weeks. *Significantly different from pre-value, paired t-test, p < 0.05.

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