Cigar, cigarillo, and little cigar use among current cigarette-smoking adolescents

Nicotine Tob Res. 2013 May;15(5):925-31. doi: 10.1093/ntr/nts222. Epub 2012 Oct 15.

Abstract

Introduction: Cigar, cigarillo, and little cigar (CCLC) use is prevalent among adolescents, particularly among those who smoke cigarettes.

Methods: Using data from a longitudinal study of smoking patterns among adolescents, we examined differences between CCLC users (ever and past 30 days) and nonusers (never and not in the past 30 days) among adolescents who smoked a cigarette in the last month (n = 486).

Results: In our sample, 76.7% reported ever trying CCLC and 40.7% reported past month CCLC use. Bivariate analyses showed that CCLC users differed from nonusers in terms of demographics, other forms of tobacco use, other substance use, and mental health. Multivariate logistic regression analyses found that both ever and past 30-day CCLC use were strongly associated with being male and concurrent use of hookah. Ever CCLC use was also strongly associated with recent use of alcohol, and past 30-day CCLC use was strongly associated with antisocial behavior. After controlling for the number of days on which cigarettes were smoked in the past 30 days, past 30-day CCLC use was associated with most other forms of tobacco use, other substance use, and mental health, but not with number of cigarettes smoked in the past month and nicotine dependence.

Conclusions: Results suggest that CCLC use is high among adolescent cigarette users and is associated with a variety of negative correlates. Importantly, many of these relationships are not accounted for by the adolescent's level of cigarette use. Further characterizing CCLC use will be important for developing more targeted and tailored interventions.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adolescent Behavior
  • Chicago / epidemiology
  • Continental Population Groups / statistics & numerical data
  • Demography
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Male
  • Prevalence
  • Self Report
  • Smoking / epidemiology*
  • Tobacco Products*
  • Tobacco Use Disorder*