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, 25 (4), 319-23

Single-incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Versus Traditional Four-Port Cholecystectomy

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Single-incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Versus Traditional Four-Port Cholecystectomy

Brittney L Culp et al. Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent).

Abstract

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has traditionally been performed using multiple small sites. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery has emerged as an alternative technique to improve cosmesis and minimize complications associated with multiple incisions. A retrospective study was performed of all patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy by a single surgeon (DTA) from April 2008 to August 2011. Charts were reviewed for surgical indication, operative technique (multiple vs. single transumbilical incision), operative time, length of stay, and surgical complications. Sixty-three patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy using a traditional approach of four skin incisions, while 62 patients underwent a single-incision transumbilical approach. Average age and sex were comparable between the two groups. Indications for surgery included cholelithiasis, cholecystitis, biliary dyskinesia, biliary pancreatitis, and porcelain gallbladder. Of those undergoing single-incision cholecystectomy, 85% (53/62) went home the same day, compared with 70% (44/63) of those undergoing four-incision cholecystectomy (P = 0.03). Among those not discharged on the same day of surgery, the average length of stay trended shorter in the single-incision group (2.8 days, range 1-6) compared with the four-incision group (3.3 days, range 1-12; P = NS). Operative time was slightly longer for those undergoing single-incision surgery (65 minutes, range 35-141) versus traditional four-incision surgery (51 minutes, range 41-109) (P < 0.001). With this single surgeon's single-incision transumbilical technique, costs were comparable between the two groups. One patient who underwent traditional four-incision cholecystectomy was readmitted for biliary pancreatitis and bacteremia on postoperative day 3. In the single-incision group, one patient was readmitted 1 month later with pancreatitis. In conclusion, single-incision transumbilical laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be an effective alternative to traditional four-incision cholecystectomy, with the added benefit of minimized scarring and a shorter length of stay. A longer operative time may be needed initially to adjust for a learning curve. This technique can be performed safely for patients with a multitude of gallbladder diseases without resulting in additional complications.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Placement of trocars for single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy: (a) photograph and (b) diagram.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Operative time for single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy over 3 years for a single surgeon.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Costs for (a) procedure and (b) hospital visit in patients undergoing a transumbilical single-incision laparoscopic procedure versus a traditional multiple-incision laparoscopic procedure.

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