Impact of differences in glucose tolerance on the prevalence of a negative insulinogenic index

J Diabetes Complications. Mar-Apr 2013;27(2):158-61. doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2012.09.011. Epub 2012 Nov 7.

Abstract

Objective: To determine the prevalence of a negative insulinogenic index (change in plasma insulin/change in plasma glucose from 0 to 30 min) from an oral glucose tolerance test according to glucose tolerance category.

Materials and methods: Data from the San Antonio Heart Study (n=2494), Japanese American Community Diabetes Study (JACDS; n=594) and Genetics of NIDDM Study (n=1519) were examined. Glucose tolerance was defined by ADA criteria.

Results: In the combined cohort, the prevalence of a negative insulinogenic index was significantly higher in diabetes 20/616 (3.2%) compared to normal glucose tolerance 43/2667 (1.6%) (p<0.05). Longitudinally, in the JACDS cohort, the prevalence did not change from baseline (3/594; 0.5%) to 5 (4/505; 0.7%) and 10 years (8/426; 1.9%) (p=0.9) and no subject had a repeat negative insulinogenic index.

Conclusions: A negative insulinogenic index occurs at a low prevalence across glucose tolerance categories although more often in diabetes, but without recurrence over time.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Asian Americans
  • Cohort Studies
  • Diabetes Mellitus / blood
  • Diabetes Mellitus / diagnosis*
  • Diabetes Mellitus / epidemiology
  • Diabetes Mellitus / ethnology
  • False Negative Reactions
  • Female
  • Glucose Intolerance / blood
  • Glucose Intolerance / diagnosis*
  • Glucose Intolerance / epidemiology
  • Glucose Intolerance / ethnology
  • Glucose Tolerance Test
  • Humans
  • Insulin / blood*
  • Insulin / metabolism
  • Insulin Secretion
  • Insulin-Secreting Cells / metabolism*
  • Japan / ethnology
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Male
  • Mass Screening
  • Middle Aged
  • Practice Guidelines as Topic*
  • Prevalence
  • United States / epidemiology

Substances

  • Insulin