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, 8 (5), 776-83

Coffee Consumption and Risk of Fractures: A Meta-Analysis

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Coffee Consumption and Risk of Fractures: A Meta-Analysis

Huifang Liu et al. Arch Med Sci.

Abstract

Introduction: Recent studies have indicated higher risk of fractures among coffee drinkers. To quantitatively assess the association between coffee consumption and the risk of fractures, we conducted this meta-analysis.

Material and methods: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for prospective studies reporting the risk of fractures with coffee consumption. Quality of included studies was assessed with the Newcastle Ottawa scale. We conducted a meta-analysis and a cumulative meta-analysis of relative risk (RR) for an increment of one cup of coffee per day, and explored the potential dose-response relationship. Sensitivity analysis was performed where statistical heterogeneity existed.

Results: We included 10 prospective studies covering 214,059 participants and 9,597 cases. There was overall 3.5% higher fracture risk for an increment of one cup of coffee per day (RR = 1.035, 95% CI: 1.019-1.052). Pooled RRs were 1.049 (95% CI: 1.022-1.077) for women and 0.910 (95% CI: 0.873-0.949) for men. Among women, RR was 1.055 (95% CI: 0.999-1.114) for younger participants, and 1.047 (95% CI: 1.016-1.080) for older ones. Cumulative meta-analysis indicated that risk estimates reached a stabilization level (RR = 1.035, 95% CI: 1.019-1.052), and it revealed a positive dose-response relationship between coffee consumption and risk of fractures either for men and women combined or women specifically.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests an overall harm of coffee intake in increasing the risk of fractures, especially for women. But current data are insufficient to reach a convincing conclusion and further research needs to be conducted.

Keywords: caffeine; coffee; cohort study; fracture; meta-analysis.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
QUOROM flow diagram of the process of article selection for meta-analysis
Figure 2
Figure 2
Forest plot for relative risks of fractures for an increment of one cup of coffee per day
Figure 3
Figure 3
Forest plot for relative risks of fractures for an increment of one cup of coffee per day among women
Figure 4
Figure 4
Forest plot for relative risks of fractures for an increment of one cup of coffee per day among men Study
Figure 5
Figure 5
Funnel plots assessing publication bias without studies causing inconsistent pooled result

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